Other Exterior Features

 

The Old Parsonage and Vestry

The Old Parsonage is run by the Landmark Trust.

The Old Parsonage is run by the Landmark Trust. The adjoining Rectory is best seen from the west front of the church

The Vestry

Since the original rectangular plan of the church was largely adhered to over the centuries, the vestry is in the churchyard

Landmark Trust is an independent charity that owns the Old Parsonage and the Stable Building next to the Rectory in Mill Lane, of which the Vestry is part.

The Rectory

Church and Rectory

Church and Rectory

 

 

 

 

 

 

Christ Church are the patrons of the parish and also own the Rectory in Mill Lane where the vicar lives; the cathedral for the diocese is also located there

The Church Hall

For further information on bookings follow the Hall link on the menu bar.

The Hall undergoing periodic thatching

The Hall undergoing periodic thatching

The Hall is very flexibly used for many purposes

The Hall is very flexibly used for many purposes

The old font

The Old Font in front of the west door

This is believed to be the bowl of an old font from Sandford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Churchyard  Cross

The Churchyard Cross

The Churchyard Cross

 

This cross has a medieval shaft and was set up on a new base and with a new head in 1857. The original head, the Lamb of God, is now mounted on the north wall of the chancel.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Gibbs Memorial

The memorial to Bill and Nina Gibbs in the south west corner of the church yard, by the sculptor, Peter Coates

The memorial to Bill and Nina Gibbs in the south west corner of the church yard, by the sculptor, Peter Coates

 

The sculptor Peter Coates designed and made this memorial to his grandparents William (Bill) and Nina Gibbs, who kept a general store opposite the “Tree” inn from 1954 until c1967. Nina died in 1989 aged 81. Bill died in 2002 aged 96. The memorial was dedicated on 12 December 2004.

When proposing the work, Peter Coates said: “Iffley church has been a fundamental presence in all our lives, providing a focus for spirit and family; my parents were married there, and it was Bill and Nina’s place of worship.”

The piece is carved in limestone as an endless knot, the indissoluble bond of their marriage. The square plinth is inscribed in a free script:
“will the day of parting be the day of gathering” (Khalil Gibran) invisible under the knot is another inscription: “WNMMII” – William & Nina 2002.

Peter Coates intended the symbolic knot and the line from Gibran to offer comfort to any who had been bereaved; the secret inscription is for the family.

 

 

 

The Horse Chestnut Tree

The last arboricultural hazard assessment of this tree took place in 2009, when the expert reported:

“This is one of the largest Horse Chestnut trees I have had the privilege to inspect and provide an opinion on. It is a magnificent specimen that appears to have entered the early ancient stage of its life cycle… and could be in the region of 250 years old; however, some individuals of the species have the ability to recover over time and extend their lives considerably.”

Looking up into the horse chestnut tree in summer

Looking up into the horse chestnut tree in summer

 

Looking up into the horse chestnut tree in winter

Looking up into the horse chestnut tree in winter

The Horse Chestnut tree from the north

The Horse Chestnut tree from the north

 

Donnington Hospital Trust own the small strip of land outside the church gate together with this old horse chestnut tree

 

 

 

 

 

 

 The “Iffley Yew”

The partially bricked-up hollow in this ancient yew tree

The partially bricked-up hollow in this ancient yew tree

The ancient yew seen from the underside to the west

The ancient yew seen from the underside to the west

Situated south of the church, this tree is estimated to be not less than 1,100 years old and may well have been planted at some time between 686 and 886 A.D. For a full account of ancient yews in general and the Iffley Yew in particular, visit the Ancient Yew Group’s website.

Those wishing to explore connections between this tree and Lewis Carroll’s Adventures Under Ground will find much interest in the website of The Lewis Carroll Society

and, more especially, in a detailed and illustrated article by Alison Gopnik, published by the Lewis Carroll Society of North America, and available on line.

The Burial Ground

View of the church from the burial ground

View of the church from the burial ground

Iffley Burial Ground is an independent charity that owns and runs the Burial Ground located the other side of the road from the churchyard.

The churchyard at St Mary’s Iffley is closed for any further burials and the upkeep of it is the responsibility of Oxford City Council

 

 

 

 

 

The Glebe Field

The Glebe Field

The Glebe Field

 

Oxford Preservation Trust owns and manages the Glebe Field in Iffley that lies opposite the church hall in Church Way, Iffley